AFRAN

Category Archives: bilateral cooperation


logo

Scholarship AINSE ANSTO French Embassy (SAAFE) – call for applications open NOW!

Applications until 1st of May 2018

Launch of the second call SAAFE, with AINSE, ANSTO, and the Embassy of France in Australia. The objective of the SAAFE program is to foster research collaborations between France and Australia in nuclear science and engineering in the field of human health, environment and nuclear fuel cycle.

The program will support early career researchers at PhD level to expand research and innovation activities and to initiate sustainable research networks and linkages to support Australia and France research and innovation.

More information, guidelines and conditions, as well as the application form are available on the AINSE website

Download the flyer: SAAFE-Flyer-2018 FINAL

images

AFRAN workshop on Sea ice biogeochemistry in the Antarctic sea ice: from observations to modelling

Climate induced changes in the sea-ice zone are expected to drastically impact marine biogeochemical cycles in polar regions, with feedbacks on the ocean and climate systems that are difficult to predict. Sea ice is a very dynamic element in polar oceans and large uncertainties remain in its response to climate change.
In this context, AFRAN is supporting a workshop is organized between French, Australian and Belgian scientists who want to collaborate and improve the modelling of sea ice biogeochemistry, comprising the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients and iron.

This workshop will take place on June 12-14th 2018, at Davos, Switzerland.

For more information, complete program and references, you can dowload the agenda: AFRAN_workshop_agenda

colonial

Colonial Extensions, Postcolonial Decentrings, and book writen by French Australianists

This volume explores the meaning of the term «postcolonial» through various theoretical perspectives and disciplinary fields of expertise, with particular emphasis on colonialist discourses within a postmodern and globalised world. It has been edited by two French academics who have also published on Australian fictions, Indigeneity and politics in Australia and the representation of Indigenous people in Europe.

For more information, download the flyer: Postcolonial Decentrings flyer

exoplanet

Franco-Australian Astrobiology and Exoplanet Workshop outcomes

The Australian National University (ANU) in collaboration with the Paris Sciences et Lettres (PSL) Research University have hosted the first Franco-Australian Astrobiology and Exoplanet School and Workshop on December 16 – 20, 2017 at the Australian National University.

exoplanet2

Over the past twenty years, astronomers have observed more than 3,000 extrasolar planets, consequently revealing the diversity of planets that exist in the universe. This has opened a door for us to re-examine and re-define theories of the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and it has also brought us to the point where discovering extra-terrestrial life has become a real possibility. The ever-increasing number of detections continues to drive exoplanet research forward and we are currently on the cusp of a technological revolution where near-future space and ground-based observatories will allow an unprecedented opportunity to further explore and characterise smaller, potentially habitable exoplanets for signs of life.

Do protoplanetary disks include compositional trends that imprint on the future planets? What should future observations of Solar System bodies focus on? Where should we search for nearby habitable Earth-like planets? How can the science of the remote detection of biosignatures be advanced? What can our knowledge of life on Earth tell us about life elsewhere in the universe? These are the questions that have been raised during the workshop.

This workshop, sponsored by ANU, PSL, and AFRAN, has brought leading experts from France, Australia and around the world, and has designed the future of collaborative projects between Australia and France in these fields.

 

cropped-afran_small.png

INAUGURAL FRENCH-AUSTRALIAN ENERGY SYMPOSIUM – UNSW, Sydney, 7 February 2018

The French-Australian Energy Symposium, an initiative conceived within AFRAN, will be organized on the 7th of February 2018 at UNSW, in the context of the 3rd Future Energy EF 3 Conference

8d2898_d347e2e0c1b745e79eb4abd7af734007~mv2

For more information about the symposium, and the complete program of the event, you can download the flyer: FLYER ENERGY SYMPOSIUM

athenes

International Conference : The Athenian Funeral Oration – 40 Years after Nicole Loraux

Registration is now open for The Athenian Funeral Oration: 40 Years after Nicole Loraux. This international conference is taking place at the University of Strasbourg from 9 to 11 July 2018. English-, French- and German-speakers often read Pericles’s famous funeral oration at school or university. Once a year, in democratic Athens, such an oration was delivered in honour of the war dead. For the Athenians it was a vitally important speech, because it reminded them who they were as a people and why they had sacrificed their sons in war. This conference is undertaking the most-thorough study of this genre in 40 years. The book to come from it will be published by Cambridge University Press.

 

In 1981 the great French ancient historian, Nicole Loraux, published a transformational study of this oration. Loraux proved that it had played a central part in maintaining Athenian self-identity. Yet, despite her study’s huge impact, it was far from complete. Her study did not compare the funeral oration and the other genres of Athens’s popular literature. Therefore Loraux could not prove her claim that the funeral oration was the most important of these genres. This conference completes Loraux’s study by making this comparison. In doing so it furnishes new studies of the 5 extant funeral orations and the most-comprehensive account to date of war’s place in democratic Athens’s popular culture.

More information on this link

CONVENOR: David M. Pritchard (Queensland/Strasbourg) – dpritchard@unistra.fr

CSIRO whitespace_big

Oui, CSIRO has a lab in France. And it’s 50!

Did you know we own and run a lab in France? Because oui do (sorry, last French pun), and this year it’s celebrating its 50th anniversary.

Some of the lab’s early projects included weed biological control, like the 1965 Wheat Industry Research Council-funded work on management options for skeleton weed, Chondrilla juncea.

The team continues to contribute to CSIRO’s many successful biological control programs, particularly as the local team members have a greater understanding of the ecology of potential biocontrol agents and their interactions with various targets, and can undertake risk assessments in the field.

The lab boasts several impactful successes over the last half a century. Let’s look at three.

 

The noble dung beetle works hard to help us have bushfly-free BBQs.bettle

Dung beetles, saving the nation from flies

The famous Aussie salute – waving flies away – might be a lot more common if it weren’t for the National Dung Beetle Program of the 1960s-90s. Dung beetles’ activities recycle nutrients into the soil, and disturbs and buries bushfly breeding sites.

Our Montpellier lab served as a base for collection of European beetles for the cooler southern areas of Australia – work that has helped us happily enjoy outdoor activities in the summer months, like BBQs, without being smothered by flies. Go dung beetles!

World first: biological control of invasive weeds

In 1971, the team at Montpellier had grown to seven, including plant pathologist, Siraj Hasan. This team played an instrumental role in the world’s first successful weed biological control program using a plant pathogen, when they discovered rust fungus Puccinia chondrillina could be used to control skeleton weed in grain production systems.

Controlling Paterson’s curse

One of the most identifiable weeds in Australia, Paterson’s curse sports bright purple flowers. Unfortunately that’s its only redeeming feature here, as it’s a noxious weed that turfs out desirable plants in pastures and causes headaches for farmers.

The Montpellier team has done some fantastic work in this space, successfully controlling the weed using three insect biological control agents: the weevils Mogulones iarvatus and Mogulones geographicus, and the flea beetle Longitarsus echii – generating billion dollar benefits for Australian agriculture.

 

team

[L-R] José Serin, Mireille Jourdan, Andy Sheppard, Mélodie Ollivier, Vincent Lesieur and Thierry Thomann. The team thanks Andy (Research Director in Health and Biosecurity) for his long standing support.

Montpellier into the future

CSIRO bought land and built its own facilities in the early 1990s, and the Montpellier site has grown to be an integral part of the Health and Biosecurity business unit.

This year the lab has seen a suite of new projects start, and the growing team is now focussed on dung beetles, snail biocontrol and two weed biocontrol projects – sowthistle and angled onion.

Congratulations to the European team. The work you are doing is magnifique!

Read more about the Montpellier team’s work on skeleton weed.

image

Foundations of the nuclear force, nuclear structure and dynamics

A collaboration between scientists of Australian (University of Adelaide and Australian National University in Canberra), French (CEA-Saclay) and US (University of Tennessee) laboratories has obtained an Australian Research Center Discovery Grant for three years to investigate the “Foundations of the nuclear force, nuclear structure and dynamics”.
This project aims to investigate a profound problem in physics: the structure and interactions of atomic nuclei in terms of their microscopic constituents.
It is expected to improve our understanding of the structure and dynamics of nuclei, their formation in the cosmos, neutron star properties, and underpins future nuclear technologies.
The collaboration, led by Prof. Anthony Thomas, is seeking a Research Associate to work in the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM) in Adelaide.
This position will be of interest to theorists working in nuclear theory and the project will be focused on the development of the Quark Meson Coupling model and its application to nuclear structure and reactions as well as neutron stars.

 

wheat

Wheat a kick in the guts for fighting diseases

A new type of wheat, which has ten times more of the fibre which helps improve gut health and also fights bowel cancer and Type 2 diabetes than normal wheat has been developed by an international team, including CSIRO and the French company Limagrain Céréales Ingrédients. The new wheat could provide millions of people with a lot more fibre without having to change their eating habits.

Read the article on this link

logo

Smart Loire Valley Programme – Call for projects 2018

The LE STUDIUM RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP is designed to attract internationally competitive researchers for at least one year. An average of twelve awards are available in this campaign. Experienced international researchers are eligible to submit an application after having negotiated their acceptance to a host laboratory and/or host enterprise.

More information on this link

Apply

Deadline: 8 February, 2018, 5pm (Paris time)